Biological Foundation of Language

Topics: Language acquisition, Linguistics, Language education Pages: 11 (2918 words) Published: October 5, 2014
CENTRAL LUZON STATE UNIVERSITY
Science City of Munoz, Nueva Ecija
INTEGRATED APPROACH
In Partial Fulfillment of the Course
Teaching English as Second Language
LL 720
By:
Christian R. Faner (M.A.L.L.)
Soriano, Ramil Jayson L (M.A. English)
To:
Sir. Mark Anthony G. Moyano, Ph. D.
CENTRAL LUZON STATE UNIVERSITY
SCIENCE CITY OF MUNO, NUEVA ECIJA
INTEGRATED APPROACH PREPARED BY: MR. FANER & MR. SORIANO
An Integrated Approach in teaching refers to a teaching method that allows students to learn in a way that is natural. The teachers strive to create a curriculum that is comfortable and fun for the kids. This is flexible and it builds on the children's interests and the teaching skills. What is Integrated Approach? “An integrated approach allows learners to explore, gather, process, refine and present information about topics they want to investigate without the constraints imposed by traditional subject barriers” (Pigdon and Woolley, 1992). An integrated approach allows students to engage in purposeful, relevant learning. Integrated learning encourages students to see the interconnectedness and interrelationships between the curriculum areas. Rather than focusing on learning in isolated curriculum areas, an integrated program is based on skill development around a particular theme that is relevant to the children in the class. “In an integrated curriculum unit all activities contain opportunities for students to learn more about the content” (Pigdon and Woolley, 1992). Smith and Ellery (1997) agree with this, saying that children can develop a deeper understanding of content through a range of purposeful activities. Integral to the model of integrated learning is the inquiry approach. Students are active learners who research, interpret, communicate, and process learning to both others and themselves. Inquiry approaches allow for students to construct meaning using their prior knowledge on a subject, and new knowledge gained during the learning process. Content-Based Instruction

NAVES’ GRID OF CONTENT-BASED INSTRUCTION (USA) CLIC (Content and Language Integrated Classroom ) (Europe) 1. Definition
“In a content-based approach, students simultaneously acquire subject matter expertise and greater proficiency in English, the medium of instruction. Additionally, they learn to master skills necessary for academic success.” D. Raphan & J. Moser: 1994 2. Principles

According to Brinton et al (1989)
1. Research shows that for successful language learning to occur, “the language syllabus must take into account the uses the learner will make of the target language”, which means systematic focusing on those language forms and functions which will best serve the learner in his/her future language use. 2. The use of “informational content which is perceived as relevant by the learner” enhances motivation in language learning and thus promotes learning effectiveness. 3. Content-based approaches are built upon the previous experience of the learner, as they “take into account the learner’s existing knowledge of the subject matter” and use pedagogical methods which aim at overall development of cognitive and academic skills, as well as linguistic skills. 4. Content-based approaches provide a larger framework and “context for language”development, in which focus is not only on fragmented examples of “correct” language forms, but also on “interaction and discourse patterns”. 5. SLA (second language acquisition) research suggests that a necessary condition for successful language learning is “comprehensible input” which requires CENTRAL LUZON STATE UNIVERSITY

SCIENCE CITY OF MUNO, NUEVA ECIJA
INTEGRATED APPROACH PREPARED BY: MR. FANER & MR. SORIANO
focussing on the meaning rather than the form. The development of good receptive communicative skills is the foundation on which productive skills are based. 3.Main authors
- Mohan: 86
- Brinton & Snow: 89
- Marsh: 99
4.Program Models
associated with
Content-Based
Instruction...

References: August, C. (2004) ‘Literature Facilitates Content-Based Instruction’. Academic Exchange Quarterly 8/2. Available athttp://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb3325/is_2_8/ai_n29117621/print?tag=artBody;col1
Gallimore, R. and R. Tharp (1990) ‘Teaching mind in society: teaching, schooling, and literate discourse’, in Moll, L. (ed.), Vygotsky and Education: Instructional Implications and Applications of Sociohistorical Psychology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Holten, C. (1997) ‘Literature: A Quentessential Content,’ in Snow, M. A. and D. M. Brinton (eds)The Content-Based Classroom: Perspectives on Integrating Language and Content. New York: Longman.
Stoller, F. and W. Grabe (1997) ‘A Six-T’s Approach to Content-Based Instruction,’ in Snow, M. A. & D. M Brinton (eds.) The Content-Based Classroom: Perspectives on Integrating Language and Content. New York: Longman. Wells, G. and G. Chang-Wells (1992) Constructing Knowledge Together: Classrooms as Centers of Inquiry and Literacy. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
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