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Topics: Pizza, Marketing, Pizza Hut Pages: 9 (3251 words) Published: August 30, 2013
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Dominos Pizza – Beyond the Dough
09TuesdayMar 2010
Posted by Gregory Dean in Marketing Strategy
≈ 7 Comments
Tags
Dominos Pizza, Dough,HeatWave, Leading Edge, Marketing Strategy, Noid, Pizza,SWOT Much like the soft elastic dough used as the foundation for which their mainstay product is built, Domino’s Pizza has shaped their marketing strategy into a juggernaut that has enjoyed nearly half a century of success. Currently a market follower—second only to Pizza Hut—Domino’s longevity and rapid rate of growth is due largely to their ability to establish, maintain, and remain true to their original marketing mix. Domino’s success, however, is due to the fact that they have been able to differentiate themselves on a very crowded playing field. Most companies, at least the successful ones, concentrate on the four Ps that compose their marketing mix. Albeit product, price, place, and promotion are the cornerstone of many marketing strategies—Domino’s Pizza has leveraged the four Cs, or consumer’s viewpoint, to establish their marketing mix. Customer solution, cost, convenience, and communication are considered each time Domino’s Pizza introduces a new product or initiates a new promotion. The science of marketing was the last thing on the minds of the Monaghan brothers when they borrowed $500 to purchase Dominick’s Pizza in 1960. With a down payment of $75, Tom and Jim Monaghan took ownership of a small pizza shop in Ypsilanti, Michigan. Their sights were firmly set on building a dynasty of three locations and monopolizing pizza delivery in a small concentrated area. From inception, the Domino’s logo contained three dots. These dots, still present on the current logo, represent Tom Monaghan’s original vision of opening three locations and develop a triangulation delivery strategy (Miranda, 2009). In the early years of business, pizza was the only item on the menu at Domino’s. Side items were never considered to be a part of the menu. Remaining sensitive to competitors and allowing competition to affect product pricing is a classic trait of a market follower (Kotler & Anderson, 2008). Domino’s was eventually forced to add medium and extra large sizes to remain competitive. Domino’s Pizza has chosen a market follower strategy. Product, one of the four Ps of the marketing mix, is an area where the market leader continues to influence Domino’s. Competition forces changes to the market followers. The first change to the product offering at Domino’s happened almost three decades after they opened. In 1989, Domino’s Pizza introduced a deep-dish pizza (Laukens, 2010). While it would stand to reason that the new addition to the menu was an answer to a competing product, Domino’s had entered a market where deep-dish was the only acceptable version of a pizza. Market research had revealed that Domino’s market demographic was culturally diverse. Domino’s responded by adding several other variations of the basic pizza. Hand tossed and thin crust pizzas were added to the menu to satisfy demand in specific market areas and remain competitive. Domino’s keeps a watchful eye on the consumer reaction to specific product and pricing. The ability to see their company from the buyer’s viewpoint is a significant advantage for any company. Domino’s Pizza listens to feedback from the consumers, and at the same time occasionally glances over the shoulder of their competition for inspiration and influence. From the customers’ feedback and buying habits, Domino’s is able to glean information to help influence direction.  Domino’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats have changed many times over. The entire pizza industry has evolved into a highly competitive array of corporate giants. And yet, it remains important to perform a SWOT analysis as often as possible. Domino’s strengths include their ability to remain unscathed, although influenced, by their competition. Moreover, their...
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